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Author Topic: Big berberis yamdori  (Read 1542 times)
Jim Doiron
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« on: September 11, 2011, 04:36 PM »

I wanted to share this berberis I pulled out of a customer's front yard landscaping. The base is pretty great, about 5 in across. I am just hoping that is survives the treatment it got.  I pulled it out and got it home with a good size root ball but the soil it was in was so dry and crumbly that when I tried to place it in the pot the ball came apart in my hands. I decided to bare root it thinking it would give me better/more even control over the watering and I was worried that the existing lumps of dirt would pull out roots that might be needed. Hopefully it works. It is recovering in an empty bay of my compost bin, covered on three sides and the top.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2011, 04:39 PM by Jim Doiron » Logged

Jim Doiron
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« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2011, 04:37 PM »

More...
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MatsuBonsai
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« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2011, 10:14 AM »

Pictures are pretty small, but looks to be incredibly drastic, out of season, and not very healthy to begin with.  I would be surprised if it lives.  Sorry.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2011, 10:26 AM by MatsuBonsai » Logged

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John Kirby
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« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2011, 10:30 AM »

Berberis are pretty tough, did you put sphagnum moss on top of the soil (over the roots)? It should help with getting this tree to sprout more roots. But Matsu has it right, pretty tough this time of year.
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Chrisl
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« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2011, 11:48 AM »

I got three Siberian Elms from the trash bin after a new sidewalk was being put in.  All three had very little roots.  One's in the ground, making it, one's in a pot and is back budding like there's no tomorrow, and the third doesn't look like it's going to make it....this was about 3-4 wks ago.  But had I a solid root ball, I would've just planted in a lg. container, not bare rooted it. 
But Good Luck!
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Jim Doiron
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« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2011, 04:23 PM »

Yeah I agree it's not the best course of action for this time of year. I though about getting a picture of the root ball situation before I bare rooted but at that point I just wanted to get it in the ground.  It was as big as the trench you see in the first picture but just couldn't handle the limited amount of movement I had to do to get it to the pot. Honestly I also thought that the tree was in such poor soil with little to no water that maybe the complete change itself would be enough to bring it back.  I will baby it and hopefully get lucky. The sphagnum is just on the surface to try and help keep the soil moist. Thanks for the replies. I will post updates as they happen.
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John Kirby
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« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2011, 05:08 PM »

The sphagnum should help. Will keep our fingers crossed.
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Gary S
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« Reply #7 on: December 11, 2011, 11:14 AM »

Barberries are tough and I've transplanted them easily, but I've never tried in the Fall.

Good luck
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Jim Doiron
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« Reply #8 on: December 11, 2011, 07:15 PM »

Thanks, as far as I can tell it's still kicking. I'm going to try and keep it protected over the winter and see whet happens. I'll let you know come spring
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Yenling83
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« Reply #9 on: December 22, 2011, 12:58 PM »

With proper aftercare I think you have at least a decent chance. 
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Owen Reich
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« Reply #10 on: December 22, 2011, 10:36 PM »

I rescued one that was barerooted in February (Nashville) and was slammed in the door of a McDonald's dumpster  Shocked.  It was shown by a friend recently after a
few years of styling.  I would not make any drastic cuts without a bunch of shoots already growing below the potential chop point.   Hoping for adventitious bud pop is risky as many old ones have big dead patches under the rough bark.
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Jim Doiron
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« Reply #11 on: December 24, 2011, 12:51 PM »

Glad to hear it's possible.  I haven't chopped much off of this one in the hopes that the more that is left the better chance something will bud back.  It's tucked away with the other trees outside hopefully putting out roots and getting ready for spring, fingers crossed. 
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