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Author Topic: I need some opinions about pines  (Read 1478 times)
Intriguedbybonsai
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« on: April 13, 2012, 10:42 PM »

I've found a website which deals with native plants of California. I am interested in their pines. Which of these pines would be well suited to grow for bonsai? Just to keep in mind, they are all 1 gallon sizes.

   Pinus attenuata Knobcone Pine

   Pinus contorta contorta Beach Pine

   Pinus edulis Pinyon Pine

   Pinus jeffreyi Jeffrey Pine

   Pinus muricata Bishop Pine

   Pinus radiata macrocarpa Cambria Pine

   Pinus sabiniana Gray Pine

   Pinus torreyana Torrey Pine
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Intriguedbybonsai
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« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2012, 11:33 PM »

I forgot to add a few more to the list.

   Pinus coulteri Coulter Pine

   Pinus flexilis  Limber Pine

   Pinus lambertiana Sugar Pine

   Pinus longaeva Bristlecone Pine
 
   Pinus murrayana Lodgepole Pine

   Pinus ponderosa Ponderosa Pine

   Pinus quadrifolia Parry Pinyon

   Pinus radiata Monterey Pine

   Pinus remorata Island Bishop Pine

   Pinus washoensis Washoe Pine  

   Pinus attenuata Knobcone Pine

   Pinus attenuataXradiata Monty Knob Pine
   
   Pinus balfouriana Foxtail Pine
   
   Pinus californica California Pine
« Last Edit: April 13, 2012, 11:38 PM by Intriguedbybonsai » Logged

cbobgo
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« Reply #2 on: April 13, 2012, 11:37 PM »

ponderosa are widely used for bonsai, but those are generally collected trees, not nursery grown.  You could do bristlecone if you have 150 years or so to grow it.  Monterey pine are used, but needles are a bit on the longer side.  I have a limber pine that I am trying, but as it's name suggests, it does not hold its shape well.  The others I am not familar with, except sugar pine that has needles that are way too long for bonsai.

- bob
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Intriguedbybonsai
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« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2012, 11:44 PM »

Thanks, Bob.

I'm also trying to get some pinyon pine seeds to germinate. I've already soaked them, and will need to refrigerate them for cold stratification. Not sure as to how long they need to be stratified. Most websites are vague in that description. As I've been reading, the seeds that sink in the water are the viable ones.
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jtucker
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« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2012, 12:01 AM »

If you're talking about Las Pilitas, they're real cool folks up there. I've planted several native gardens and buy as much from them as possible. If you're not talking about them, do a search for that nursery. They're super knowledgeable about natives, not so much bonsai but they're open to talking about it.

As far as pines, Torrey Pines are awesome specimens, but I'm pretty sure they like conditions within eyesight of the ocean (who wouldn't?!?!), so Esco might get a little too hot/dry for them. Pinyon pines might work well as they are desert-ish trees. Here in our local mountains we have mostly Coulter, Jeffrey, and Yellow Pine, so those would be the best suited as far as easy growing conditions. I think each of those except for Pinyon has super long needles, but it's worth a shot.

Just a fun little fact, Jeffrey Pines have mature bark that smells like butterscotch when you get your nose right up next to them. I bought a couple 1-gal Jeffrey's to goof with a few months ago, so I have no clue how it's going to work out!

I with pines especially, I think the best bet for a beginner is to get a little bigger tree and work with that. It's really hard to figure out how pines work with only a tiny tree to work with!
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Intriguedbybonsai
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« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2012, 12:33 AM »

Yes, I am talking about Las Pilitas! Grin It's a wonderful site, and I wish I had found out about them a lot sooner. I also know of another 2 growers in Northern Cali who sells pines and other conifers. They are Giant-sequoia.com and Jonsteen.com

I really would like to try a Ponderosa. I love the way their bark looks.
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cbobgo
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« Reply #6 on: April 14, 2012, 12:03 PM »

If you are interested at all in the more traditional pine species like JBP and JWP, check out www.evergreengardenworks.com

- bob
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gtuthill
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« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2012, 03:04 PM »

Hi,

I'm in New Zealand and we have lots of radiata.  Yes their needles are long and twisty when young but improve with age. They grow quite fast and have nice mature bark.

I'm starting some contorta from seed, their needles are not twisty and i have seen some quite short needles on full size trees.  Pinus contorta is a weed here Wink  Fast growing in our conditions, they produce cones on trees only 3-4 years old.

Greg

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