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Author Topic: YouTube Bonsai Videos  (Read 3402 times)
somegeek
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« on: October 02, 2009, 01:10 AM »

I subscribed to this guy and have watched all of his videos.  As a bonsai newbie, I've gleaned a lot of good info.  This guy has done a good job with his videos.

http://www.youtube.com/user/chasnsx

somegeek
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johng
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« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2009, 05:45 AM »

I also enjoy Charles's video and appreciate the effort he goes to make them!!

John
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boon
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« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2009, 11:24 AM »

Those movies are very very bad.   If you want to learn how to do good bonsai.  Do not follow his way of doing bonsai.
have a good bonsai jouney,  take a different road.
Sincerely,
Boon

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somegeek
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« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2009, 11:53 AM »

Those movies are very very bad.   If you want to learn how to do good bonsai.  Do not follow his way of doing bonsai.
have a good bonsai jouney,  take a different road.
Sincerely,
Boon



Care to elaborate?   Huh?
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rockm
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« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2009, 11:59 AM »

I  don't intend this as an attack, but only a warning that this might not be the best source of info.

I watched the "Fall Repotting" video. While I applaud the enthusiasm, I would never take these vids as gospel on bonsai know how.

In the video I watched. I noticed more than a few things that troubled me.

The soil mix is wrong and potentially lethal (potting soil is NEVER appropriate with a juniper, or much else for that matter). "All purpose" sand contains fine particles that will clog drainage--combining it with potting soil multiplies the clogging factor exponentially.

I would never use a root hook with more than a single tine. Multiple tines shred root masses. Single tines are best. Simple bamboo chopsticks can work well if you can't find or can't afford an appropriate root hook.

The pot he's putting the plant into is far less appropriate for the tree artistically and horticulturally. It's too deep and overpowers that skinny trunk, while at the same time complicates drainage even more--deeper pots stay  wetter at the bottom and drier at the top than shallower containers. That could spell trouble with overwatering.

The soil the plant is in shows why the top growth is so spindly and weak. It's mush. It sticks together in a wettish looking block. The soil has decomposed to the point it's a mess...Decent bonsai soil should crumble to so extent even after years in a pot. It should  be "friable" as it's termed. That soil mass is dense and airless.

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John Kirby
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« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2009, 12:15 PM »

Thanks Mark,
I think you covered it very well. John
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somegeek
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« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2009, 12:50 PM »

I  don't intend this as an attack, but only a warning that this might not be the best source of info.

I watched the "Fall Repotting" video. While I applaud the enthusiasm, I would never take these vids as gospel on bonsai know how.

In the video I watched. I noticed more than a few things that troubled me.

The soil mix is wrong and potentially lethal (potting soil is NEVER appropriate with a juniper, or much else for that matter). "All purpose" sand contains fine particles that will clog drainage--combining it with potting soil multiplies the clogging factor exponentially.

I would never use a root hook with more than a single tine. Multiple tines shred root masses. Single tines are best. Simple bamboo chopsticks can work well if you can't find or can't afford an appropriate root hook.

The pot he's putting the plant into is far less appropriate for the tree artistically and horticulturally. It's too deep and overpowers that skinny trunk, while at the same time complicates drainage even more--deeper pots stay  wetter at the bottom and drier at the top than shallower containers. That could spell trouble with overwatering.

The soil the plant is in shows why the top growth is so spindly and weak. It's mush. It sticks together in a wettish looking block. The soil has decomposed to the point it's a mess...Decent bonsai soil should crumble to so extent even after years in a pot. It should  be "friable" as it's termed. That soil mass is dense and airless.



Thanks for the detailed info.  I've read a few threads on bonsai mix contents and the one comment that stuck with me is that bonsai soils vary by location due to climate and what works for one person may not work for another.  I believe this guy is in Southern California?  Understood regarding the mushy decomposed contents.  I've learned the hard way about properly draining soil.

Maybe an experienced bonsai guy can't appreciate these videos as their technique is more or less set in stone and varies, but these videos get the mental juices flowing to think about how to approach and do things for this newbie at least.  Appreciate this guy taking the time this guy is taking to put these together.
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rockm
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« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2009, 01:07 PM »

" Appreciate this guy taking the time this guy is taking to put these together."

Like I said, I appreciate the enthusiasm. The issue of learning online is the same one that dogs just about all learning via Youtube or most any other online resources--you mostly get what you pay for. This isn't the first online bonsai tutorial I've seen that doesn't so much teach bonsai as show you how to do things almost exactly wrong.

The best way to learn bonsai is to find a local instructor, grower or hobbyist who knows what they are doing and has been doing it consistently for more than a couple of years--bonsai clubs are great sources for these people. Get them to show you IN PERSON how to do things. I guarantee you will learn more in five minutes with hands on instruction than you will learn in 15 hours of watching videos.

By the way, bonsai soils do vary by location, but it's more due to what kinds of soil components are available and affordable there, rather than specific soil requirements (although that does play a part).

Also, repotting procedures are not set in stone. They can vary tremendously depending on age, species and overall condition and health of the plant.
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John Kirby
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« Reply #8 on: October 02, 2009, 02:48 PM »

Geek,
um, I did bonsai for Avery long time before I learned how to do bonsai. One thing I have learned is that when Boon takes the time to say don't do something, it is worth listening to. You will notice he isn't hereuch, he only replies to make a point.

In this case I would say that Nero was enthusiastic as well. Please don't let enthusiasm be confused with knowledge. Mark is very knowledgeable and has given great advice.

John
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boon
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« Reply #9 on: October 02, 2009, 03:00 PM »

thank you John and Rockm,
my intention is only for the good for the tree.  and hopefully improve the art of bonsai. 
it is very sad to see someone who is abusive to trees.  and he does not know it.  and also try to show others how to do it.
internet is a very good source of information both good and bad. 
Peace,
Boon
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somegeek
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« Reply #10 on: October 02, 2009, 03:23 PM »

thank you John and Rockm,
my intention is only for the good for the tree.  and hopefully improve the art of bonsai. 
it is very sad to see someone who is abusive to trees.  and he does not know it.  and also try to show others how to do it.
internet is a very good source of information both good and bad. 
Peace,
Boon

Understood - thanks.  Smiley
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MatsuBonsai
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« Reply #11 on: October 02, 2009, 03:38 PM »

Proper repotting is about the most important thing I believe I have learned from Boon.  I have never been quite so tired as after a full 3 day session of repotting.

Well, repotting and wiring anyway.  Figure 3, figure 3, figure 3.
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J

dorothy schmitz
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« Reply #12 on: October 02, 2009, 10:08 PM »

Those movies are very very bad.   If you want to learn how to do good bonsai.  Do not follow his way of doing bonsai.
have a good bonsai jouney,  take a different road.
Sincerely,
Boon



Hi Boon,

I stopped watching the video when the guy said "potting soil" from the local blah blah blah :Smiley..
Unfortunately there are still folks out there teaching exactly that. See you soon.

-dorothy

 


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somegeek
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« Reply #13 on: October 02, 2009, 10:28 PM »

Those movies are very very bad.   If you want to learn how to do good bonsai.  Do not follow his way of doing bonsai.
have a good bonsai jouney,  take a different road.
Sincerely,
Boon



Hi Boon,

I stopped watching the video when the guy said "potting soil" from the local blah blah blah :Smiley..
Unfortunately there are still folks out there teaching exactly that. See you soon.

-dorothy

 




Seems a lot of folks in this thread are already spending the energy to post here to discount this guy's work in this video... maybe someone, instead of posting here, should spend their energy on messaging this guy via YouTube to explain the disservice he's doing to the Bonsai community by posting his videos.    :Smiley
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rockm
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« Reply #14 on: October 05, 2009, 07:51 AM »

That will do no good. Trying to control what gets posted on the Internet is futile. This guy obviously thinks he's doing good. I'd hate to squelch the intent...Also bad comments posted on someone else's web site or in heated email exchanges with stranger can also make you a target for who knows what. You never know who you're talking to online...

It's best for those seeking knowledge to assume what they're watching might be wrong and work from there. This is understandably difficult for someone who is just starting out. That's why I recommend joining a local club, or inquiring with established national or international clubs online. The American Bonsai Society for instance, has offered online "mentor"programs that  pair off experienced members with new members looking to learn. The mentor answers questions via email, etc. I don't know if that programs still exists (I participated in it a few years ago), but the web site is worth a look anyway for local contacts.

http://www.absbonsai.org/



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