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Author Topic: Trunk Chopping Trident Maples best time?  (Read 4937 times)
Shane Martin
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« on: December 28, 2011, 03:19 AM »

Here in my sub tropical climate down in Northern New South Wales Australia, I have usually done my trunk chops at the end of winter, just before bud swell. Most of the time this works just fine, but have noticed a few cases of the callusing being over the top, and result in an ugly callus. This goes for trunk chops, and any large roots as well. Some of my trees are going to be ready to chop this coming winter and are quite large.... some up to 6 inches thick.
Can this technique be done safely at any other time of year?.... and should I feed or not prior to the chop process. Roots will get a chop as well.
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Larry Gockley
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« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2011, 07:41 PM »

Hi Shane. Did you try to recess the trunk area at the cut, so that a callus would grow around the top, and not bulge so much?  I also read in a John Naka book, about making a broom style with a trunk chop. John suggested wrapping twine or tape tightly at the top of the chop to prevent a bulge. Have not tried it myself, but sounds good. Larry
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bwaynef
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« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2011, 08:45 PM »

I'm never good on timing.  I usually ask someone before I do something I think is season-sensitive ...so I won't try to help you on that.

Check out this link that shows how to get a smooth transition from a trunk chop.
http://bonsaijournal.com/beginners-trunk-chop-101.php
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Shane Martin
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« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2011, 12:11 AM »

I'm never good on timing.  I usually ask someone before I do something I think is season-sensitive ...so I won't try to help you on that.

Check out this link that shows how to get a smooth transition from a trunk chop.
http://bonsaijournal.com/beginners-trunk-chop-101.php


Thanks Larry & bwaynef.....
Larry I almost always cut at an angle just above a shoot or bud, which goes against most advice as generally a lot of people prefer the straight cut method, which I have done on a couple of trunks this season to compare methods. In the link which bwaynef supplied, (i'd come across it before.... but thanks all the same), it recommends the straight cut method also, but makes no mention of recessing the cut. I've always been concerned about water sitting on top of the flat cut, hence my reason for an angle cut..... I don't have much trouble healing these large wounds, as there is almost always a new leader getting all the energy as I remove most if not all side branches. Anyway, we're drifting off my original point, which was more a timing change for chops, rather than method.
Would mid to late Summer be a problem...... ? The trees in question are all in the ground and very healthy. Growth has hardened off. Just thinking it may be better as there is not so much energy as early spring/summer. Or have I got it completely wrong.

From the article...
Timing
The best time for most trunk chops is in mid to late spring or early summer (depending on your geographic location); after the new leaves have formed and begun to harden off.
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bwaynef
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« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2011, 12:07 PM »

From the article...
Timing
The best time for most trunk chops is in mid to late spring or early summer (depending on your geographic location); after the new leaves have formed and begun to harden off.

That's what I was thinking.  Guess I should've read the article.
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Gaffer
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« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2014, 04:30 PM »

Happy new year everyone
I have a need of some guidance . A bit off topic but not in the end result. I have a trident that I have let grow in the garden for a few years and it is time to do some serious stuff. There are in the one trunk 3  nice trees one on top of each other. I want to layer them out and was wondering if I can layer them all at the same time or should  I just start at the bottom and do one a year. I am not in a rush I just want to get started. Please help me. Does Peter Tea ever read our blogs.
Thanks
Qualicum Brian
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bwaynef
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« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2014, 11:03 AM »

There are in the one trunk 3  nice trees one on top of each other. I want to layer them out and was wondering if I can layer them all at the same time or should  I just start at the bottom and do one a year.
I've seen this question pop up before ...and can't recall the answer.  If you wanted to go the patient route, I'd start at the top rather than the bottom though.  If you opt for the 3-in-1, I'd only recommend it if the tree grew very strongly this past season until dormancy ...and you're willing to commit to its needs, both water and fertilizer, through this season.
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donmaple
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« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2014, 05:12 PM »

Gaffer, it looks like you and I are in similar growing zones. Here are some things to think about. When you layer a tree, you interrupt the flow of sugars to the roots but not the water from the roots. Therefore, the roots are working hard to supply water but getting nothing in return to maintain health. The leaves are the factories of sugar, so the more leaves you have feeding the roots the better the health of the roots. If you layer the tree ; (1) below all the leaves: no sugar to the roots = unhealthy roots, (2)halfway to top: half sugar to roots, half sugar to callus = happy roots and happy callus, (3) most of the way to top: really happy roots and somewhat happy callus. The health of the tree is very important in all of this, the healthier the tree the better the results. It has been my experience with Tridents that the older the bark is, the longer it takes the callus to generate roots. Now having bored you to death...I would recommend taking the two uppermost trees as one layer this spring and then the top of that tree the next spring. If you had a picture of your tree to share it would be easier to say for sure. Hope this helps, Don
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Gaffer
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« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2014, 08:13 PM »

Thanks don
I took other advise as well and it was very similar to yours. I have lots of time so I chose to just layer the top tree. We have been having a wonderful winter here withe maybe only 5 days of some frosty so I am way ahead of myself with potting up etc. I have lot of last years seedlings so if I run into trouble as long as it calluses I can always root graft. Thank you for responding.
Qualicum Brian
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